New York Police Department
Leadership Commissioner Marcus Donovan Founded 1845 (re-founded 2019)
Type Law Enforcement Headquarters The Watchtower, Red Hook
Status Active
Contact Manhattan
Reputation Disbanded during the height of the Second American Civil War, the NYPD has been rebuilt and is faced with the challenging task of recovering from more than a century of corruption and racism.

Following its collapse during the Second American Civil War, the NYPD ceased to exist as a law-enforcement organization. After the war's conclusion, law-enforcement in the New York City Safe Zone was placed in the hands of the 91st Military Police Battalion. From the moment of the Safe Zone's founding the reconstruction of the NYPD has been among the highest of priorities. In June of 2019 after years of preparation, the NYPD was reinstated with a jurisdictional boundary of the NYC Safe Zone. Areas outside of the Safe Zone now fall within the purview of the 91st Military Police Battalion.

New York Police Department

Additional Info

Organization

Leadership

NYPD Commissioner: Marcus Donovan

Precincts

The NYPD is broken up into precincts that have jurisdiction over the 9 boroughs of the NYC Safe Zone. Below are listed the 9 boroughs that the NYPD has jurisdiction in and the number of precincts therein. Precincts are mapped as close to their pre-war counterparts as possible.

Borough Precincts
Bay Ridge 68th, 72nd
Elmhurst 94th, 108th
Ferrymen's Bay 63rd, 69th
Jackson Heights 114th
Park Slope None, governed by adjacent precincts
Phoenix Heights 75th, 106th
Red Hook 76th, 84th
Sheepshead Bay 60th
Williamsburg 88th, 79th

NYPD SCOUT (Special Crimes Operations and Unconventional Tactics)

SCOUT.png

SCOUT is a special operations division of the NYPD, consisting of SLC-Expressive police officers hand-picked from across civilian and military backgrounds. SCOUT's role within the NYPD is to handle major crimes cases that traditional police work cannot quickly or effectively handle. Unlike the original SCOUT, which was designed to combat terrorism, the new SCOUT is not a combat-oriented force, but an arm of the NYPD that leverages access to unique SLC-Expressive abilities to heighten the department's ability to resolve crimes. SCOUT frequently interfaces with groups like SESA when crimes become federal jurisdiction and with the paramilitary group Wolfhound who is on contract as a SWAT-replacement until such a time as that branch of the NYPD can be rebuilt.

Due to the nature of play, most (if not all) NYPD players will be members of SCOUT.

Organization

SCOUT follows the operational procedures of the NYPD, save that all non-administrative SCOUT officers operate at a Detective's rank.

Captain: Oliver Wilson
Lieutenant: Elisabeth Harrison
Sergeant: Dheeraj Modi

Detective: Marisa Blomgren
Detective: Colette Demsky
Detective: Kaylee Sumter
Detective: Erin Gordon
Detective: Felix Ivanov

Assistant to the Captain: Mira Sadowsky
Analyst: Sarah Hart

Playing SCOUT

When playing a member of SCOUT, please remember that you are a law enforcement officer employed by the State of New York and are expected to uphold certain behavioral codes. While SCOUT is a special branch of the NYPD they still abide by many of the same rules that are in place today. Here are some key items to consider when playing a SCOUT officer:

  • Search warrants apply to telepathy You can't search someone's mind without a warrant unless they consent to it.
    • Information learned through telepathy is inadmissible in court. You can't arrest someone because of something you saw in their head. But you can use a clue you found in someone's mind to lead you to a location or person to investigate. But remember, without telepathy being admissible it usually isn't grounds to issue a warrant, so that can be a tricky situation!
  • Don't Kill People. Now I know "officer involved shootings" happen too much in the real-world America, but the government of the ST universe is trying to walk back those mindsets and policies. You have non-lethal weapons and resources, use them to your advantage. Remember that you have to file a report whenever you discharge your firearm, you're accountable for how many bullets are in your gun, where it is. That's no different than ability use. If you're a pyrokinetic and FLAME ON while on the job, you have to report it. And if it wasn't warranted, it could be considered police brutality.
  • If you damage something, the NYPD is responsible for it. Smash up a car? That's on the department. Blow up a building with your Awesomekinesis? That's on the department. And that means it's, ultimately on you. If you don't want to lose your job and end up owing the city way too much money, be responsible.
  • You are a representative. Are you Evolved? Congratulations you are now the public face of the Evolved and any scandal you get in reflects on your kind. The same goes for the NYPD.
  • You're not above the law. If you get caught breaking the law, you'll more than likely suffer some consequences for it the least of which is losing your badge.

Someone with a background in law enforcement is highly welcomed to clean this up/add more pertinent details!

Relationship With SESA

The NYPD and SCOUT are local law enforcement. They handle local crimes ranging from parking violations to murder and kidnapping. But SESA also exists in this reality (as do other federal agencies!). So how do they interact with the NYPD?

  • FBI: The FBI gets called in when a crime is considered beyond the scope of the NYPD's ability to handle. With SCOUT and the advent of SLC-Expressive abilities that is less frequent. But the FBI is always consulted for kidnapping that leaves the Safe Zone and for terrorist-related activities. (in conjunction with the Department of Homeland Security in the latter case).
  • SESA: SESA is like the FBI, except tey step in when an issue directly relates to an SLC-Expressive individual or individuals. Is that serial killer SLC-Expressive? It's SESA's jurisdiction not the FBI. Was the kidnapper or person kidnapped SLC-Expressive? SESA is involved. Is the terrorist organization SLC-Expressive or targeting expressives? SESA is involved. SESA is the biggest ally the NYPD has. They have access to more lab technology, the nation's registry, and tools/resources the NYPD doesn't have. There is no rivalry between these two orgs, and they will often work hand-in-hand together.
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